Trendbulletin 6 Texture

  • This live/work space in Bologna is a great example of layers of exciting texture from the raw brick walls to the rug, patina of the armchairs to the detail of the window wall beyond. First featured in our August 2016

    This live/work space in Bologna is a great example of layers of exciting texture from the raw brick walls to the rug, patina of the armchairs to the detail of the window wall beyond. First featured in our August 2016 "Trends" edition. Photography Fabrizio Cicconi. Styling Francesca Davoli.

  • Another picture from the live/work space in Bologna because I love it so! In this image, you can see so clearly how natural light is an active player in the decor, casting it's own wonderful patterns and textures. Photographer Fabrizio Cicconi; styling Francesca Davoli.

    Another picture from the live/work space in Bologna because I love it so! In this image, you can see so clearly how natural light is an active player in the decor, casting it's own wonderful patterns and textures. Photographer Fabrizio Cicconi; styling Francesca Davoli.

  • The EDapartment, as conceived for the developers of Greenwich Peninsula was a chance for the magazine to explore some of its ideas in the bricks and mortar, so to speak. Naturally texture played a big part from our choice of rugs to the embossed paper used on the walls. First featured in the May 2016 edition. Photography Ben Anders.

    The EDapartment, as conceived for the developers of Greenwich Peninsula was a chance for the magazine to explore some of its ideas in the bricks and mortar, so to speak. Naturally texture played a big part from our choice of rugs to the embossed paper used on the walls. First featured in the May 2016 edition. Photography Ben Anders.

  • This home in Melbourne features a kitchen that marries silver travertine cladding the island unit with a quartzite stone countertop, a chestnut floor and stained oak cabinets. Every detail combining to make a glorious textural whole. First featured in the September 2016 edition. Photographer Tess Kelly.

    This home in Melbourne features a kitchen that marries silver travertine cladding the island unit with a quartzite stone countertop, a chestnut floor and stained oak cabinets. Every detail combining to make a glorious textural whole. First featured in the September 2016 edition. Photographer Tess Kelly.

  • The same house in Melbourne also effortlessly shows how the materials palette has been carried seamlessly through to the lounge. But here, rugs and a sheepskin draped over the iconic Hans Wegner chair, complete the picture. Photographer Tess Daly.

    The same house in Melbourne also effortlessly shows how the materials palette has been carried seamlessly through to the lounge. But here, rugs and a sheepskin draped over the iconic Hans Wegner chair, complete the picture. Photographer Tess Daly.

  • Sometimes more really is just more! The owners of this space in Milan are avid collectors, as such their home is replete with curios and rich with texture. I love the irreverance of it all, the easy switch from one floor finish to the next, and the jubilant mix and mismatching throughout. Photography Fabrizio Cicconi; styling Francesca Davoli.

    Sometimes more really is just more! The owners of this space in Milan are avid collectors, as such their home is replete with curios and rich with texture. I love the irreverance of it all, the easy switch from one floor finish to the next, and the jubilant mix and mismatching throughout. Photography Fabrizio Cicconi; styling Francesca Davoli.

  • It may surprise some that I love this room from a house in South Africa. Maybe I wouldn't personally live with that sofa, but I absolutely love the overall feel and colour palette of this room, from the exposed, yet painted, thus no longer too raw, brickwork, to its juxtaposition with the delicate curtaining. I love the tiled floor which is a joyous celebration of pattern and colour. And I love the consistent use of gold accents, the exposed ceiling and the filigree detailing on the windows. Something to delight from every angle. First featured in the September 2016 edition. Photographer Elsa Young.

    It may surprise some that I love this room from a house in South Africa. Maybe I wouldn't personally live with that sofa, but I absolutely love the overall feel and colour palette of this room, from the exposed, yet painted, thus no longer too raw, brickwork, to its juxtaposition with the delicate curtaining. I love the tiled floor which is a joyous celebration of pattern and colour. And I love the consistent use of gold accents, the exposed ceiling and the filigree detailing on the windows. Something to delight from every angle. First featured in the September 2016 edition. Photographer Elsa Young.

  • Making the mix and mismatch tile thing easy for you, The Baked Tile Company sell this

    Making the mix and mismatch tile thing easy for you, The Baked Tile Company sell this "Vintage" multi-tile design (this sample is 44.2cm square) by the square metre. £30 per sqm. bakedtiles.co.uk

Why touch matters

 

Text by Michelle Ogundehin, Editor-in-Chief, ELLE Decoration

 

If I have an enduring theme in my own home, or when writing about interior design, it is texture, texture, texture! It’s always all about the textures. Why? Because for me the finishing of all surfaces with a degree of tactility elevates any domestic space to the possibility of becoming a sensory cocoon — without it, you merely have an enclosure for your belongings. And a potentially sterile one at that.

And I don’t just mean the addition of a few carefully chosen throws on the bed or sofa either. I’m talking about the very feel of your floor beneath your toes, the sensation of touching your walls, or even the idea of being excited just by gazing upon your ceiling. Every surface has the ability to delight and stimulate, why waste a single one.

Materials board for the study are of the EDapartment showing the mix of the terracotta Golran rug to the stones, fabric, leather and wallpaper finishes used in neighbouring spaces.

Materials moodboard for the study area of the EDapartment at Greenwich Peninsula, showing the palette of the rich silk, terracotta-toned Golran rug used in the space to the stones, fabric, leather and wallpaper finishes used there too, and in other rooms.

After all, as human beings our sense of touch is extraordinarily sophisticated. We all know how instantly warm and reassuring a hug from a friend, lover or our children can be; or the therapeutic and healing value of a warm and relaxing massage. As infants we learn about the world through touch, understanding through play what things are supposed to feel like. Thus, who does not recoil on encountering dampness where it’s not expected, or feel a sense of surprise, if not shock, if touched unexpectedly, especially if by someone unfamilar.

Touch is a sense which instantly ignites exquisite psychological triggers, from love to fear. And nowhere is this more important than in the intimate spaces of our homes, where we should feel safe to be at our most vulnerable and unguarded.

Consider the joy that could flood through your body on stepping out of bed to be greeted by a heated, fluffy, cosseting floor. Such are the pleasures of underfloor heating, of which I am an enormous fan. Literally grounding you in happiness from the moment of waking. The opposite, that of padding across a cold, or worse wet, floor, would clearly prompt an entirely different start to the day.

As such, touch matters, and yet I think it’s often under utilised at home, So, what are the things you could do that play on this most vital of senses in order to give yourself the equivalent of a home hug everyday? Herewith my top three…

 

1. If it’s not possible to install underfloor heating (and it is a lot easier than most people think,  especially with the pre-formed installation boards and low build options), then get seriously rug happy. My minimum would be placing them in these three places: A: one to step onto straight out of bed, as thick and luxurious as possible, a sheepskin (Ikea offer a great affordable selection) is perfect; plus you also need to invest in a truly cosseting pair of slippers (I love the look of these!). B: lots of easily washable mats in the bathroom so that standing in front of the sink, or stepping out of the bath is a pleasure not an unwelcome distraction; C and finally one under the sofa, or the seat you most use to relax in. Having warm, cosy feet is almost a primal need for happiness; it is simply not possible to feel joy if your feet hurt, or are cold. As such, there is absolutely nothing better than bare toes on warm fur or wool. So if you can’t train the dog to be your comforter, rugs it is.

2. Why have flat walls when you can adorn them with life! I am of course referring to my very favourite homes-must-have of textured wallpaper. It’s a way to do pattern without having to commit to multi-coloured prints as the rolls come in white, ready for you to over-paint in any colour of your choosing. But double the effect by finishing them in gloss. The additional light which will bounce off the surface will enhance the relief and give the eye that little bit extra to rest on and enjoy. Personally, I can’t bear matt finishes for walls as I feel they suck all the energy out of a room, not to mention being harder to keep clean (caveat: if your walls are less than perfectly plastered smooth, and that’s the look you’re after, then matt can be your friend, as it will help to hide all manner of lumps and bumps). Regardless, I prefer satin or silk finishes so that every drop of daylight can be exploited as an active player in your decoration. Walls don’t have to be perfect.

The EDapartment, as conceived for Greenwich Peninsula was a chance for the magazine to explore some of its ideas in the bricks and mortar, so to speak. NAturally texture played a big part from our choice of rugs to the Anaglypta paper used on the walls. First featured in the May 2016 edition. Photography Ben Anders.

The EDapartment, as conceived for Greenwich Peninsula was a chance for the magazine to explore some of its ideas in the bricks and mortar, so to speak. Naturally texture played a big part from our choice of rugs to the mix and finish of furniture to the embossed paper used on the walls. First featured in the May 2016 edition. Photography Ben Anders.

3. Learn to love tiles outside the kitchen or bathroom! There is an order in tiling which is inherently calming. The rows, the parallel lines, the neatness no matter what. They also come in the most extraordinary variety of colour, sizes and finishes. The only limit to their usage is your imagination. I use them everywhere, from headboards to shelf backs, skirting boards to dado trims.

Making the mix and mismatch tile thing easy for you, The Baked Tile Company sell this "Vintage" multi-tile design by the square metre. £30 per sqm. bakedtiles.co.uk

Making the mix and mismatch tile thing easy for you, The Baked Tile Company sell this “Vintage” multi-tile design by the square metre (sample shown is 44.2cm square). £30 per sqm. bakedtiles.co.uk

The March “Small Spaces Big Ideas” issue of ELLE Decoration UK is on sale from 2 February to 1 March. Or you can download it here. Subscribe here. Or get back issues here!

#EDtrendbulletin #EDUKMar17

Twitter @ELLEDecoMO   Instagram @michelleogundehin

See also michelleogundehin.com



0 Comments

Would you like to share your thoughts?

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Leave a Reply