BEST BRITISH DESIGNER

September 1, 2014 / The British Design Awards

The creative visionaries behind the year’s most influential products

  • THE WINNERS: BARBER & OSGERBY – Trained architects Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby are interested in the industrial aspect of design. Their ‘Planophore’ room divider/bookcase for Vitra is inspired by a model aeroplane from 1871 and they’ve been chosen to design Crossrail trains for 2017 (barberosgerby.com). Scroll through the gallery to see the rest of this year’s nominees

    THE WINNERS: BARBER & OSGERBY – Trained architects Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby are interested in the industrial aspect of design. Their ‘Planophore’ room divider/bookcase for Vitra is inspired by a model aeroplane from 1871 and they’ve been chosen to design Crossrail trains for 2017 (barberosgerby.com). Scroll through the gallery to see the rest of this year’s nominees

  • DOSHI LEVIEN – London duo Nipa Doshi and Jonathan Levien combine Doshi’s Indian heritage and eye for culture with Levien’s background in industrial design. The studio’s ‘Shanty’ cabinet for BD Barcelona (see ‘Best British Product’) epitomises this approach (doshilevien.com).

    DOSHI LEVIEN – London duo Nipa Doshi and Jonathan Levien combine Doshi’s Indian heritage and eye for culture with Levien’s background in industrial design. The studio’s ‘Shanty’ cabinet for BD Barcelona (see ‘Best British Product’) epitomises this approach (doshilevien.com).

  • MICHAEL ANASTASSIADES – This Waterloo-based innovator creates lighting that’s like functional art. His ‘String Lights’ for Flos consist of white lights strung on lengths of black Kevlar-reinforced cable to resemble pylons (michaelanastassiades.com; flos.com).

    MICHAEL ANASTASSIADES – This Waterloo-based innovator creates lighting that’s like functional art. His ‘String Lights’ for Flos consist of white lights strung on lengths of black Kevlar-reinforced cable to resemble pylons (michaelanastassiades.com; flos.com).

  • SEBASTIAN WRONG – Wrong is committed to offering contemporary design at affordable  prices. His latest launch, the brand Wrong for  Hay, stocks his own furniture and lighting alongside work by the  likes of Nathalie du Pasquier and Stefan Diez (wrongforhay.com).

    SEBASTIAN WRONG – Wrong is committed to offering contemporary design at affordable prices. His latest launch, the brand Wrong for Hay, stocks his own furniture and lighting alongside work by the likes of Nathalie du Pasquier and Stefan Diez (wrongforhay.com).

Best British Designer 2014: Barber & Osgerby

Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby have had a prolific year, with furniture launches, museum installations and
an exhibition. Here, they tell us more.

What has been your biggest project of 2014? In physical terms, our ‘Double Space’ installation at the V&A Museum was the biggest [created with BMW, the structure comprised two huge revolving mirrored objects that offered a new view of the cartoons in the Raphael Gallery], while the broadest was our furniture range for Vitra, which launched in Milan in April. January saw the opening of our first curated exhibition, ‘In the Making’, which is shortly to travel to Dublin. But the year’s most time-consuming project has been our design for the Crossrail train, due for completion in 2017.

Which of your upcoming ventures are you most excited about? A new 2,500-square-metre permanent gallery at the Science Museum that we’ve been working on since 2010 with our architecture practice, Universal Design Studio. The ‘Information Age’ space tells the story of developments in telecommunication from the mid-1800s to today. It has been challenging for the whole team, but we’ve learnt so much about how our society has been transformed by inanimate objects.

How does it feel to win another British Design Award? We believe passionately in Britain’s creativity and it’s an honour to make a contribution to this. We’re thrilled to have won.

(barberosgerby.com)

British Design Awards logos