BEST BRITISH EXTERIOR

September 1, 2014 / The British Design Awards

The UK’s most exciting new architectural projects, each one with its own unique appeal

  • THE WINNER: THE MAGAZINE RESTAURANT AT THE SERPENTINE SACKLER GALLERY BY ZAHA HADID ARCHITECTS – With its undulating membrane roof pierced by stiletto-like columns and glass walls that allow generous views of Kensington Gardens, Zaha Hadid’s design for the Serpentine’s new restaurant is a mix of the futuristic and the organic.  Lime green tables echo the surrounding foliage (serpentinegalleries.org). Scroll through the gallery to see the rest of this year’s nominees

    THE WINNER: THE MAGAZINE RESTAURANT AT THE SERPENTINE SACKLER GALLERY BY ZAHA HADID ARCHITECTS – With its undulating membrane roof pierced by stiletto-like columns and glass walls that allow generous views of Kensington Gardens, Zaha Hadid’s design for the Serpentine’s new restaurant is a mix of the futuristic and the organic. Lime green tables echo the surrounding foliage (serpentinegalleries.org). Scroll through the gallery to see the rest of this year’s nominees

  • ‘ROOM’ SCULPTURE BY ANTONY GORMLEY FOR THE BEAUMONT – A rare example of an artwork you can sleep in, this abstract crouched figure by the British sculptor adorns the façade of The Beaumont, the first hotel by restaurateurs Jeremy King and Chris Corbin, situated in a landscaped square in Mayfair. Measuring four square metres and forming the sleeping area of a larger suite, ‘Room’ has just enough space inside for a double bed and is panelled in wood (thebeaumont.com).

    ‘ROOM’ SCULPTURE BY ANTONY GORMLEY FOR THE BEAUMONT – A rare example of an artwork you can sleep in, this abstract crouched figure by the British sculptor adorns the façade of The Beaumont, the first hotel by restaurateurs Jeremy King and Chris Corbin, situated in a landscaped square in Mayfair. Measuring four square metres and forming the sleeping area of a larger suite, ‘Room’ has just enough space inside for a double bed and is panelled in wood (thebeaumont.com).

  • PAUL SMITH STORE BY 6A ARCHITECTS – The British designer’s flagship store on London’s Albemarle Street is as striking outside as it is inside, decorated with intricate cast-iron panels set against black-painted walls. ‘I don’t think there’s another cast-iron shop front in central London,’ says Smith. ‘There are drawings of mine showing a cat, a bird and a boot, if you can spot them.’ (paulsmith.co.uk).

    PAUL SMITH STORE BY 6A ARCHITECTS – The British designer’s flagship store on London’s Albemarle Street is as striking outside as it is inside, decorated with intricate cast-iron panels set against black-painted walls. ‘I don’t think there’s another cast-iron shop front in central London,’ says Smith. ‘There are drawings of mine showing a cat, a bird and a boot, if you can spot them.’ (paulsmith.co.uk).

  • SOUTHEND BEACH HUTS BY PEDDAR & SCAMPTON ARCHITECTS – Beach huts are usually a bit twee, but  not these. Pastel paintwork is replaced  by bright colours and the huts are angled  so as not to block sea views from the promenade behind. Each one has a translucent wall filled with pebbles to strengthen it against coastal storms (pedderscampton.com).

    SOUTHEND BEACH HUTS BY PEDDAR & SCAMPTON ARCHITECTS – Beach huts are usually a bit twee, but not these. Pastel paintwork is replaced by bright colours and the huts are angled so as not to block sea views from the promenade behind. Each one has a translucent wall filled with pebbles to strengthen it against coastal storms (pedderscampton.com).

Best British Exterior 2014: The Magazine restaurant at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery by Zaha Hadid Architects

Zaha Hadid’s striking design for this gallery restaurant combines futuristic and organic elements, including stiletto-like columns and glass walls that look out onto Kensington Gardens. Here, the world-renowned architect explains the vision behind the venue.

What makes the design so successful? The Magazine restaurant makes the Serpentine Sackler Gallery a new cultural and culinary destination. It’s a light, transparent and distinctly contemporary space that complements the solidity of the existing building and synthesises old and new. The extension feels ephemeral, like a temporary pavilion, although it is a fully functional permanent building. The interior is bright and social: light pours in from all sides and through the five steel columns that open up as light ‘scoops’. The curvature of the roof animates the venue with its sculptural fluidity.

What was the biggest challenge? Creating a fully enclosed structure that achieves lightness through its materials and dynamic geometries.

How does it feel to win a British Design Award? It is always very exciting to realise an ambitious design and
to see so many people enjoy using the spaces we create. There is a great deal of imagination and technical expertise in the UK and this recognition is very rewarding.

(serpentinegalleries.org)

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