BEST BRITISH INTERIOR

September 1, 2014 / The British Design Awards

Whether they feature dramatic effects or more relaxed style, these are spaces you’ll want to revisit

  • THE WINNER: BERNERS TAVERN AT THE LONDON EDITION HOTEL – The star attraction at Ian Schrager’s hotel in the West End, Berners Tavern is a cavernous space in a restored Edwardian building, with all the grandeur that implies. Its restrained taupe and rose palette is brought to life with an extraordinary  art display, featuring more than 300 pictures. It took a total  of five weeks to hang (edition-hotels.marriott.com). . Scroll through the gallery to see the rest of this year’s nominees

    THE WINNER: BERNERS TAVERN AT THE LONDON EDITION HOTEL – The star attraction at Ian Schrager’s hotel in the West End, Berners Tavern is a cavernous space in a restored Edwardian building, with all the grandeur that implies. Its restrained taupe and rose palette is brought to life with an extraordinary art display, featuring more than 300 pictures. It took a total of five weeks to hang (edition-hotels.marriott.com). . Scroll through the gallery to see the rest of this year’s nominees

  • ACE HOTEL BY UNIVERSAL DESIGN STUDIO – The pared-back, industrial rooms in this trendy Shoreditch hotel – the first branch of Ace to open outside the US – offer  a well-balanced mix of vintage furniture, contemporary pieces by UK-based manufacturers such as Benchmark and Ercol, and neat details including Ally Capellino-designed coin trays and bespoke stationery (acehotel.com/london).

    ACE HOTEL BY UNIVERSAL DESIGN STUDIO – The pared-back, industrial rooms in this trendy Shoreditch hotel – the first branch of Ace to open outside the US – offer a well-balanced mix of vintage furniture, contemporary pieces by UK-based manufacturers such as Benchmark and Ercol, and neat details including Ally Capellino-designed coin trays and bespoke stationery (acehotel.com/london).

  • AKASHA HOLISTIC WELLBEING CENTRE AT HOTEL CAFE ROYAL BY DAVID CHIPPERFIELD – ‘Akasha’ is a Sanskrit word meaning ‘space’, encompassing the four elements of earth, air, fire and water. Chipperfield’s serene design embraces them all, from the honey-coloured stone walls and wood details to the elegant blue pool (hotelcaferoyal.com).

    AKASHA HOLISTIC WELLBEING CENTRE AT HOTEL CAFE ROYAL BY DAVID CHIPPERFIELD – ‘Akasha’ is a Sanskrit word meaning ‘space’, encompassing the four elements of earth, air, fire and water. Chipperfield’s serene design embraces them all, from the honey-coloured stone walls and wood details to the elegant blue pool (hotelcaferoyal.com).

  • MERCHANTS TAVERN BY VERY GOOD & PROPER – As if to complement its menu of simple, seasonal comfort food, Shoreditch restaurant Merchants Tavern works a classic mid-century look with a cosy feel: think parquet flooring, copper pendant lights, curved leather banquettes and ‘MT Club’ retro armchairs upholstered in red and grey. The latter are designed by Very Good & Proper, also responsible for the rest of the interior, and are available to buy for domestic use (merchantstavern.co.uk; verygoodandproper.co.uk).

    MERCHANTS TAVERN BY VERY GOOD & PROPER – As if to complement its menu of simple, seasonal comfort food, Shoreditch restaurant Merchants Tavern works a classic mid-century look with a cosy feel: think parquet flooring, copper pendant lights, curved leather banquettes and ‘MT Club’ retro armchairs upholstered in red and grey. The latter are designed by Very Good & Proper, also responsible for the rest of the interior, and are available to buy for domestic use (merchantstavern.co.uk; verygoodandproper.co.uk).

Best British Interior 2014: Berners Tavern at the London Edition Hotel

The Berners Tavern restaurant has been the talking point of the London Edition hotel since it opened in a restored Edwardian building last year. The cavernous space has the feel of an art gallery, with more than 300 pictures on the walls. Hotelier Ian Schrager talks us through the project.

What makes the design so successful? There was a real respect for the existing architecture, which we wanted to preserve but improve. We’ve tried to combine a traditional British country-manor aesthetic with a modern city feel.

What was the biggest challenge? Believe it or not, the lighting. We wanted it to feel contemporary and original, but it needed to be right for the space in terms of scale and proportion. We were inspired by some of the fixtures in New York’s Grand Central station, which we updated and tried to make feel appropriate for the space. The other difficulty was taking a room that was almost a perfect cube with very high ceilings and making it feel intimate. Our aim was to create a restaurant that would appeal to both people around the globe and those in the know in London.

What does it feel like to win a British Design Award? I’m honoured, humbled and thrilled, and I’m sure my partners at Marriott are too. It’s great to be recognised for our efforts in making this hotel special.

(edition-hotels.marriott.com)

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