FAIRTRADE FORTNIGHT: THE HOME EDIT

February 23, 2015 / OLD news posts
  • Eighteen Rabbit – Named after a Mayan ruler of the city of Copan, located on the coast between Honduras and Guatemala, this store stocks fairly traded handcrafted creations. These ceramic ‘Perching Birds’ (£4 each) were produced in a family-run factory in Thailand. They are pictured atop ‘Diamond’ vases (£30 each; eighteenrabbit.co.uk)

    Eighteen Rabbit – Named after a Mayan ruler of the city of Copan, located on the coast between Honduras and Guatemala, this store stocks fairly traded handcrafted creations. These ceramic ‘Perching Birds’ (£4 each) were produced in a family-run factory in Thailand. They are pictured atop ‘Diamond’ vases (£30 each; eighteenrabbit.co.uk)

  • Luma – With a textile supplier in India that’s partnered with Oxfam and Greenpeace, Luma has unimpeachable eco credentials. Its ‘East Meets West’ collection of cushions combines Indian techniques with a Scandinavian eye for pattern and colour (£49 each; lumadirect.com)

    Luma – With a textile supplier in India that’s partnered with Oxfam and Greenpeace, Luma has unimpeachable eco credentials. Its ‘East Meets West’ collection of cushions combines Indian techniques with a Scandinavian eye for pattern and colour (£49 each; lumadirect.com)

  • In The Trees – Working with sustainable wood suppliers in the UK and Asia, this small firm produces finely crafted gifts, including these rustic ‘Chunni’ chopping boards, which are handmade from mango wood (£14.41 each; inthetrees.co.uk)

    In The Trees – Working with sustainable wood suppliers in the UK and Asia, this small firm produces finely crafted gifts, including these rustic ‘Chunni’ chopping boards, which are handmade from mango wood (£14.41 each; inthetrees.co.uk)

  • Nkuku – Taking its name from a slogan seen painted on a whitewashed hut in Zambia during the owners’ travels, this online shop sells socially responsible homewares, including these ‘Jambo’ jute runners, made using traditional handlooms (£79.95 each; nkuku.com)

    Nkuku – Taking its name from a slogan seen painted on a whitewashed hut in Zambia during the owners’ travels, this online shop sells socially responsible homewares, including these ‘Jambo’ jute runners, made using traditional handlooms (£79.95 each; nkuku.com)

  • Creative Women –This enterprise works with studios in Ethiopia and Morocco, where skilled craftswomen use handwoven cotton and silk, traditional techniques and eco-friendly dyes to create beautiful textiles. This napkin can be purchased from Steven Alan (£6; stevenalan.com)

    Creative Women –This enterprise works with studios in Ethiopia and Morocco, where skilled craftswomen use handwoven cotton and silk, traditional techniques and eco-friendly dyes to create beautiful textiles. This napkin can be purchased from Steven Alan (£6; stevenalan.com)

  • Dignify – This website collates items produced by brands that have ethical aims. This pitcher (£27) is by Vancouver firm Just Potters, which teaches skills to people who face barriers to work, including addiction and physical and mental challenges (dignify.ca)

    Dignify – This website collates items produced by brands that have ethical aims. This pitcher (£27) is by Vancouver firm Just Potters, which teaches skills to people who face barriers to work, including addiction and physical and mental challenges (dignify.ca)

Buying Fairtrade products doesn’t just apply to ethically sourced bananas; there are also many stylish homeware brands that follow the foundation’s ethos. To celebrate Fairtrade Fortnight – February 23 to March 8 – we are shedding light on some of our favourites. From exquisite ceramics to textiles, browse our gallery of highlights. (fairtrade.org.uk)

Compiled by: Clare Sartin